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Bag Worm Treatments

To make matters worse, if pesticide residue is present on surrounding foliage, the mature larvae may pupate early. This means, some of the most effective control measures often involve chemicals. Chemical control of bagworms should last around two weeks. Continue reading [...]

Worms in Trees

There are so many different types of worms that love to hang out in trees that it’s tough to keep track. Just a few of the different types of worms in trees include bagworms, Catawba worms, apple tree worms, Christmas tree worms, army worms, and catalpa tree worms. Continue reading [...]

“Sand Case” Carrying Worm?

Worms called gastrotrichs have bodies covered with tiny tubes that secrete a cement. The cement tubes make it appear as though the worm is carrying a case filled with sand! Continue reading [...]

Bag Worm

Because the bag worm goes unnoticed until it is mature, it is tough to control. If there happens to be pesticide residue on surrounding foliage, the mature larvae may pupate early. The bag worm has few known predators and even fewer known parasites, so some of the most effective control measures often involve chemicals. Continue reading [...]

Bag Worms

Bag worms are interesting creatures. They grow on the inside of little bags that can be found hidden inside the bark of the tree trunks. Inside these bags, you might find hundreds, if not thousands of eggs containing bag worms (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis). The larva prefer red cedar and arborvitae but they also like apple, birch, black locust, cypress, elm, juniper, oak, pine, poplar, spruce, and sycamore. Bag worms occurs mostly from New England to Nebraska and south through the state of Texas.Inside of the bag, which may be camouflaged with foliage, bark, and other debris, the larva is tan or brown with black spots. Once it emerges, the larva is black. It spins down on a silk string in search of a host plant. In some cases, the larva never makes it all the way down on the string, Continue reading [...]

Bagworms and Bark

The bagworm larva prefer red cedar and arborvitae above all as well as apple, birch, black locust, cypress, elm, juniper, oak, pine, poplar, spruce, and sycamore. The bagworm occurs mostly from New England to Nebraska and south through the state of Texas. Continue reading [...]