Worm In Toilet No Cause For Alarm

We recently heard from a reader in London. She explained that she found a worm in her toilet bowl one morning, and she knows the toilet wasn’t used since the night before. She is curious about the identity of the worm and why it might be in her toilet. From the photo, we can see that the worm is quite small. It appears to be brown, thin, and 1-2 inches long.

worm in toilet in London


ATTENTION: GET PARASITE HELP NOW! At All About Worms we get a lot of questions about skin parasites, blood parasites, and intestinal parasites in humans. Because we can't diagnose you, we have put together this list of doctors and labs who understand and specialize in dealing with parasites in humans! That resource is HERE

First off, since our reader specifically clarified when the worm was found, we can safely say we don’t think there is any chance this is a parasitic worm that came from her or anyone in her family. The worm was found hours after anyone had used the toilet, and the toilet is clearly filled with water, not urine or feces. That being said, since we aren’t medical professionals and can’t give medical advice, we have to cover our bases and mention that if our reader is worried about her health or thinks this might be a parasite, then she should see a doctor ASAP.

The three most common worms that readers find in their toilets are drain fly larvae, bloodworms (a.k.a. midge fly larvae), and earthworms. We think the creature is too big to be a drain fly larva, but it might be a bloodworm or an earthworm. Bloodworms are small, thin, red worms that feed on organic material and need moisture in order to survive. If this is a bloodworm, then our reader will need to give her toilet a thorough cleaning using a cleaning agent and a pipe cleaning brush. Once she has scrubbed out the grime that has built up in her toilet bowl and pipes, she shouldn’t find any more bloodworms!

It is also possible that the specimen our reader found is an earthworm. Earthworms are the most common worm-like organism that readers find in their toilets. The creature our reader found looks a little on the small side for an earthworm but it could just be a small earthworm! Like bloodworms, earthworms need a wet environment to survive and they can even live submerged underwater for long periods of time! We believe earthworms usually end up in toilets after they slip through a small gap in the plumbing system. As long as our reader only found one worm, she doesn’t need to worry. She can simply remove the worm and place it back outside.

No Paywall Here!
All About Worms is and always has been a free resource. We don't hide our articles behind a paywall, or make you give us your email address, or restrict the number of articles you can read in a month if you don't give us money. That said, it does cost us money to pay our research authors, and to run and maintain the site, so if something you read here was helpful or useful, won't you consider donating something to help keep All About Worms free?
Click for amount options
Other Amount:

To conclude, we think the creature our reader found in her toilet could be either a bloodworm or an earthworm. It is also possible that it is a different species entirely, but these are two of the most common worms found in toilets, and they share some resemblance to the organism our reader found.

Summary
Worm In Toilet No Cause For Alarm
Article Name
Worm In Toilet No Cause For Alarm
Description
We think the creature our reader found in her toilet could be either a bloodworm or an earthworm. It is also possible that it is a different species entirely, but these are two of the most common worms found in toilets, and they share some resemblance to the organism our reader found.
Author

Author: Worm Researcher Dori

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *