Pink Fluff Invades Clothing and Raises Concerns About Clothes-eating Pests

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“These are everywhere: face, head, inside,” states this reader in her submission to us. “What should I do?” she asks about the organisms pictured below, which vary in appearance from long, brown pieces of matter, to ovate, green-gray objects.

She has been to the hospital three times so far, but whoever she has consulted has called her “crazy”. As a result, she has now come to us for advice. “A woman knows her body,” she continues. “I feel like I’m dying a slow death.”

Now, unfortunately our advice can only go so far as recommending medical professionals that she can go to for better help. We cannot identify the organisms, because they are causing medical concerns, and since we are not medical professionals, we are not qualified to make such identifications. Doing so would be to diagnose the issue, which often does more harm than good when the diagnosis comes from someone who is not a medical professional.

So, with that in mind, what we can recommend is that our reader do one or more of the following:

1) Search for a medical parasitologist in her area using this directory of medical parasitology consultants: https://www.astmh.org/for-astmh-members/clinical-consultants-directory.
2) Search for a local parasitologist by doing a Google search for “medical parasitologist (name of the closest big city)” or “tropical medicine specialist (name of the closest big city)”.
3) Get in touch with Dr. Omar Amin at the Parasitology Center at https://www.parasitetesting.com.

A medical parasitologist specializes in the field of organisms that negatively affect people’s health. As such, they would take our reader seriously. If our reader were to consult a medical parasitologist, we advise that she tells them her entire story and show them the same photos she sent us. This can potentially help speed up the process of identifying the organisms and coming to a solution.

To conclude, we are unfortunately not qualified to identify the organisms which are plaguing our reader, but we hope nonetheless that the resources listed above come to use, and that we were able to help in some way. We wish her the very best, and hope that she knows she is not alone in her struggle.

 

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Summary
Pink Fluff Invades Clothing and Raises Concerns About Clothes-eating Pests
Article Name
Pink Fluff Invades Clothing and Raises Concerns About Clothes-eating Pests
Description
"Are these fabric moths and carpet beetles?" asks Shanan about the two different objects pictured below, one pink and stringy, and the other a tangled mess of greenish-gray threads. "I've been at war with them for about three years now. I've sprayed numerous pesticides, different dusts, and vacuumed until my arms fell off! I've had to move, get a new car, and buy brand new clothes more times than I can count. Tip: New clothes are infested as well. They also like to munch on my hair. I'm at the end of my rope. Please help. I live in Southeast Georgia. These are pieces of material that I cut out of a brand new jacket!"
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Author: Worm Researcher Anton

7 thoughts on “Pink Fluff Invades Clothing and Raises Concerns About Clothes-eating Pests

  1. You guys, it’s a moth larvae and the hairworm is likely from a beetle, mosquito or fly, likely a heartworm vector due to Wolbachia released worldwode to cull mosquitos, dengue and chikiyunga.

    It is a generally harmless bacteria unless the arthropod carrier happens to bite on an animal with heartworm – or dirofilaria. This passes between mammals and reptiles,crustaceans, 60 % of insects. And we think that’s better than dengue fever… Perhaps wherever Dengue fever is an issue. But here. Well…we don’t have that here. Now we have wolbachia wreaking havoc on normal “harmless” animals and pests. Except they’re not harmless. People are committing suicide. Losing all semblance of self after being Tracked by “whatever the eff it really is.”

    So while wolbachia supposedly doesn’t live or travel on surfaces – it is known to remerge months or years after successful antibiotic therapy in animals. SIXTY, thats right, 60% of insects and many arachnids carry it. Including clothes moths, flies, mosquitos and even beetles carry it.

    What about horshoe crabs? Thise are actually arthropods? Are we all being fooled? Look into that stuff or better yet, don’t go down the rabbit hole. Either way, it ikely won’t matter.

    These animals can survive great temperatures and travel . When you think of the most resistant dirofilaria you have to consider birds, fish, raccoon, bats and rats of course – because these animals survive all weather. So do their parasites.

    So what were seeing here is very resilient cotton pests being imported from endemic dengue areas, that have been treated with wolbachia, shipped to the garment and or paper makers, distributors – and then us, the end users end up with cotton containing parasitized pests like tiny white leaf hoppers, mites, fleas, flies and even midges or no see ums – all carrying this bacterial endosymbiont and catalyst for dirofilaria heartworm in mammals. Which – like most nematodes has a terrestrial and infectious L3 stage. Wtaf is going on? The websites worldwide champion this.

    Now should a beetle or fly bite an animal with heartworm and then you – you see where this can go. And spread quickly. With NO KNOWN HUMAN DIAGNOSTIC TEST OR TREATMENT RECOMMENDATIONS TO DATE.

    Thats right. There are no commercial tests to date – your pet can get tested but for humans – nada. Yes we were all forced to mask and stick cotton up our noses. We are all infected. Is long covid really long covid? Cmon. Or are the bizarre symptoms the awful global head cold really the effect of worldwide wolbachia release on mosquitos and filariasis?!!

    Something to think about. I was one of the people that masked up and quarantined. Got the first of the shots. Did what I was supposed to do. Shopped online. And I believe I ended up with imported heartworm as a result of the wolbachia release and continuous ordering of products containing some infected pests from Amazon.

    The cure can’t be worse than the problem, no? Or else – like the last vet I consulted with said, “It has to be normal, right? Or else – God Help us All!”

    That was her answer to questions after my prodding for answers to why my cats hair was moving. Why my hair was moving. Was it even hair? What were the nematodes in the poop and why can’t anyone treat us all at once? Why is the same stuff visible under the clear wrapper in unopened amazon packages? Heartworms got people and animals living in a never-ending nightmare, looking like medusa – with third world disease and first world denial and diagnostic issues.

    God help us all.

    1. Oh my God. Thank you for shedding some light on this for us. Im interested in any information you can share regarding this. Omg How can they do this to us? My life is in total shambles because of this nightmare. Lost just about everything. I have regular thoughts of suicide. I have spent probably $10,000 on things to eliminate or alleviate symptoms, new clothes, makeup, furniture, moving expenses, Dr’s. This is an assault on our lives. Someone should be held responsible. Countless lives ruined and lost over this and they’re still doing it. Wtaf!

      1. Hi Jennifer.

        First I want to say, YOU ARE NOT ALONE. PLEASE know at least myself and a few people with credentials better than I are working on this. We WILL shine light on whatever needs to be done for awareness and diagnostics, hopefully best management curative solutions if possible.

        Please promise you’ll at least stick around to find out what it is?

        You can help get to the bottom of it all and help the people suffering from what we theorize is biocontrol gone wrong via wolbachia infected nematodes imported on cotton causing intense inflammatory reactions and human infections contingent on contact with certain arthropods as well as heartworm positive companion animals.

        If we’re wrong, we’ll- that’s great! Because there are no recommended treatments or commercially available tests in the US. If we’re all crazy, great give us a bunch of chillax meds or hypnosis to stop being attacked by the unthinkable.

        If we’re right, we will need more people like us to rally for transparency, research, testing and treatment for the rest of those who have gone to the darkest depths without any solutions.

        I’m going to share a contact link on Tuesday if that’s OK. It’ll be for collaborating, registering symptoms and directions for sending any specimen to the lab at the university of a student I’m working with. Talk soon.

  2. You guys, it’s a moth larvae and the hairworm is likely from a beetle, mosquito or fly, likely a heartworm vector due to Wolbachia released worldwode to cull mosquitos, dengue and chikiyunga.

    It is a generally harmless bacteria unless the arthropod carrier happens to bite on an animal with heartworm – or dirofilaria. His passes between mammals and reptiles,crustaceans, 60 % of insects. And we think that’s better than dengue fever. Perhaps.

    So while wolbachia supposedly doesn’t live or travel on surfaces – it is known to remerge months or years after successful antibiotic therapy. Clothes moths, flies, mosquitos and even beetles carry it. And those animals can survive great temperatures . When you think of the most resistant dirofilaria you have to consider birds, fish and bats – because these animals survive all weather. So do their parasites.

    So what were seeing is very resilient cotton pests being produced in endemic dengue areas, treated with wolbachia, shipped to the garment makers and us, the end users end up with tiny white leaf hoppers, mites, fleas, flies and even midges or no see ums. Bit remember moths and beetles carry this bacterial endosymbiont.

    Now should a beetle or fly bite an animal with heartworm- you see where this can go.

    And no – there are no commercial tests to date – for humans at least. Yes we were all forced to mask and stick cotton up our noses. We are all infected. Is long covid really long covid? Or are the bizarre symptoms the effect of worldwide wolbachia release on mosquitos?

    Something to think about. I was one of the people that masked up and quarantined. Got the first of the shots. Did e
    What I was supposed to do. And I believe I ended up with imported heartworm as a result of the wolbachia release and some clothing pests from Amazon. The cure can’t be worse than the problem, no? Or else – like the last vet I consulted with said, “It has to be normal, right? Or else – God Help us All!”

    That was her answer to questions after my prodding for answers to why my cats hair was moving. Why my hair was moving. Was it even hair? What were the nematodes in the poop and why can’t anyone treat us all? Heartworms got people and animals living in a never-ending nightmare, looking like medusa – with positive third world disease and no knowledgeable treatment.

    God help us all.

  3. I call them squirms . I am one with my squirms . They are in and out of me . They gradually evolve and change and have different xycles and stages. I have hair I pull out of my eyes . My cuticles are weird and growing over my nails . My ass is broke out in bumps. I think theyre exit wounds not bites. My poor kids have them . I think they give me heartburn and now an unlcer. I’ve given up on getting help m imma afraid they will kill one of us . Just drop dead with seizures when they break your brain blood barrier . I have boogers 1that are literally worms . I have them in my blood . They will call you crazy . I have a wavy hair one inch long fly off my face and instead of float down to the floor this thing literally hovered for30 seconds . I’m not delusional. I think maybe they come from overseas xould possibly be in new xlothes from factories . They survive All wash cycles. I’m kt sure what kind of life form they are . Ive heard mold fungus
    I feel like if you can vacuum everyday out bleach or vinegar In your bath . Exfoliate and get a hobby that keeps your hands busy … I paint

  4. The first one with the pink stringy thing I’ve had for 8 years now it’s invaded my clothes it shoes through my underwear and my pants I just got a new pair of sweatpants and it’s all over them it’s cut my hair to boy short I’m a woman and it was down to my shoulders? I also may need I’m in Pennsylvania!? I did call when it happened to me in 2014 I walked underneath of a tree and something fell out of the tree that felt wet but it hadn’t rained onto my head and I told the parasite doctor then what had happened when I felt what I saw in the horror in her voice was disturbing! She said oh my God you have the worst one she said get $100 and come down here but that was three towns over I didn’t have a car and I definitely didn’t have $100 at that point so when I did finally get all that together and I went there they had closed up shop. So I’ve been dealing with this for 8 years because when I go in the hospital they want a 302 me because these things are fast I have bite marks on my face on every orifice of my body under the back of my knee these things are horrible I don’t know what they are but it’s kind of like a which I just found out is a bedworm where it covers up but it it’s also they’re bigger I’ve had them for 8 years so now they’ve gotten a lot bigger I just wish her the best because I’m going through hell right now and I’ve had five children since? And I hope to God they don’t have them! And also you guys put down there for a doctor infectious disease? Infectious disease doctors will not see you unless you have another script from another doctor referring you to them!? And the hospitals the doctors are arrogant they won’t even look like look at your hair for lice so it’s I really wish somebody would find out what this stuff is because it’s affecting a lot of people a lot I mean I went on boards where they’re they’re all like freaking out they had to throw their clothes out as well I’m down to one suitcase I had a whole room full clothing I had to leave all of my stuff in my old apartment it’s bad and somebody needs to figure out what it is because it’s eating my hair is eating bite marks I had this past winter tight on tights on and I drove up from Florida to Pennsylvania and I didn’t get out of the car or anything and I had to like saying marks on the back of my knee that needed to really strong prescriptions of antibiotics and the Darkness is still there under my knee I mean behind my name sorry but not one of the doctors that gave me the antibiotics asked what it was or nothing they just gave me the antibiotic? So what she’s showing you with that pink she just said that’s a new jacket she cut that out of brand new! So obviously these things are not like in clothing they’re in on her or in her and on her I can feel them coming out of every orifice of my body going into him even my eyes I have about oh I don’t know three videos a day which I take snapshots of and I still can’t figure it out with Google Lens or anything because I want to get rid of it and I’ve tried everything everything you can think of! So if you guys do happen to find out what it is I’d really like to know as well thank you

    1. Hello. I think my pictures have been misconstrued. The pink fluff is the the seam that I cut out of my jacket. The little things in the material are the problem. I find tiny hard eggs, along with what looks like moving threads in the seams of all my clothes. It doesn’t matter what kind of material it is. I also have curly hair which has proven to be a buffet for these pests. What I think are knots in my hair, turn out to be tiny opaque worms. They don’t bite , but sometimes I itch where the seams of my clothes lie on my skin. Under clothes are the worst. The other pic with the gray matter moved ever so slowly. Upon observation, I could see tiny dots which I assumed could be a mass of fabric moth Larvae. I found this under my bed. I now put my clothes in a deep freezer, but they seem to become infested again in a couple of days. I guess I still have larvae and adults still living in my closet and drawers. I hope this helps somebody because this is by far the most traumatic thing I’ve ever had to deal with.

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