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Posted in Worms Facts Worms Found in the House Worms Generally

Carpet has Lines Running Through Substrate that Look Like Worms

“Is there something in the carpet or is it just old/cheap?” asks Laura in La Mesa City, San Diego county, California. “It was professionally cleaned about two weeks ago. Additionally, and not 100%, I positively believe there are some creatures with white heads and darker bodies in the soil of a Money Tree that is on our catio. I’m used to the drain fly larvae or whatever that stuff is but these just seem different. Also, I do NOT feel anything in or on my body. These look too small to be carpet beetle larvae but my entire carpet looks like that. My photography skills are horrible and I could not get a good shot of these lines that run through the substrate. In conclusion, I have touched them but cannot just pick them up; they seem too deep. Sorry for yet another paranoid sounding inquiry; I just don’t want to get in trouble with property management. Thank you.”

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Posted in Black Soldier Fly Larvae - BSFL Composting Worms Worms Found in the House

Brown Worm-like Creatures in Toilet are Black Soldier Fly Larvae

“What are these brown worm-like bugs in my toilet?” asks AnnaMarie in her submission regarding the two, segmented creatures pictured below. She offers no further context, and, unfortunately, the lighting is not the best, and it is hard to make out the organisms’ finer characteristics. That said, based on their shape – particularly the little tapered tip at one end of its body – we think that these might be black soldier fly larvae. How these two critters would have come to show up in AnnaMarie’s toilet is a mystery to us, as black soldier fly larvae are not typically found in this spot.

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Posted in Carpet Beetle Larvae Worms Facts Worms Found in the House

Hairy, Striped Bug is a Carpet Beetle Larva

“What is this?” asks Ayoade in his submission regarding the bristly, striped, bug-like creature pictured below. He does not provide any further context – something that we always advise our readers do. Fortunately, in this case, we have seen this creature so many times that we do not need more context to identify it. This is a carpet beetle larva. We can tell that it is a carpet beetle larva based on its brown coloration, stripes, long bristles, six prolegs, and the ovate shape of its body. Now, although we were able to identify the organism without it, context would have still come in handy when it comes to knowing how many of these Ayoade found, and where he found them. Regardless, we will simply give a basic overview of carpet beetle larvae.

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Posted in Case Bearing Larva Caterpillars Worms Found in the House

White Worm in Fabric Could be a Clothes Moth Larva

“Can you kindly identify this worm?” asks Lindsey in her submission regarding the white, worm-shaped organism pictured below. “The hair on top moves around like a feeler.” She does not add more context than this, and given how vague the photo is, we are not sure we can give her a concrete answer to her question. The worm almost looks like it is under a sheet, or some kind of fabric – as if it is struggling to break through it. As such, the hair on top looks like it is likely just a stray fiber from that material. For these reasons, we are not even sure what the true color of the organism is.

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Posted in Carpet Beetle Larvae Worms Facts Worms Found in the House

Where to Check Your Home for Carpet Beetle Larvae

“Is this worm a carpet beetle larva worm?” asks Dawn in her submission regarding the darkly-colored worm-like creatures pictured below. “And if I only found one so far, would there be a nest or others somewhere else? Where would I look? Thank you.” To start with, we have to unfortunately point out the low resolution and bad lighting in the photographs, and why that will make it difficult for us to confirm with certainty whether or not the organisms our reader found are carpet beetle larvae. We will say that, if she finds more of these larvae in places where there are a lot of textile items, such as on her bed, a couch, in a wardrobe or closet, or on rugs or carpet, then these could be carpet beetle larvae. However, we cannot confirm this identity based solely on the photo or on the context.

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Posted in Army Worms Garden Worms Worms Found in the House Worms Generally

Cluster of Gray Worm-like Creatures are Armyworms

“We just discovered this cluster on the wall toward the ceiling”, writes Hillary in her submission regarding the multitude of gray worm-like creatures pictured below. “Google tells me they might be Army Worms. Do you agree? If so, how do we get rid of them? We live in Maryland, if that’s helpful for the region. Thank you!” Right off the bat, we have to commend Hillary for her sleuthing: these are most likely armyworms. They could also be American ermine moth larvae – another species of moth that lays their eggs in such clusters. Though, if these were American ermine moth larvae, Hillary would have likely also spotted a cluster of translucent eggs next to the larvae, so for that reason, we would agree that these are armyworms.

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Posted in Worms Facts Worms Found in the House Worms Generally

Array of Insect-like Creatures Found in Home Includes a Ladybug and a Cockroach

“I have found these hard-shelled worm-like creatures”, writes our reader, Summer, in her submission regarding the various organisms pictured below. “The first two pictures were found in dryer lint. The third picture was found on the living room carpet. Just was trying to see if y’all could tell me what exactly they are? Thank you!” Firstly, we want to thank our reader for these great photos – they really help us get a good grasp on what kinds of features these creatures possess. Secondly, we think that the creatures in the first photo might be larvae of the bigger bug in the second photo, while the spotted, beige and brown creature in the second photo is most likely a ladybug.

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Posted in Carpet Beetle Larvae Worms Facts Worms Found in the House

Little Brown Worm-like Critter Crawling on Sheets is a Carpet Beetle Larva

“Is this a carpet beetle larva?” asks this reader in her submission regarding the tiny, brown creature pictured below. “I found it in my bed and I am not sure since it seems smaller than the others. If not a carpet beetle larva, then what is it?” Based on the photo alone, we would say that this is indeed a carpet beetle larva. The stripes, bristles, and shape all point to this conclusion. Carpet beetle larvae are infamous household pests, as they like to munch on textiles much like the sheets on our reader’s bed on which the bug was found. In addition to bed sheets, they like to feed on carpets, rugs, clothing, loose hair and fur, and any other items made from organic materials like cotton, wool, feathers, leather and more.

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Posted in Carpet Beetle Larvae Worms Facts Worms Found in the House

Light Brown Bug with Bristles is a Carpet Beetle Larva

“What is this?” is all this reader asks about the little brown bug pictured below. Although she provides no context, which is usually imperative to us being able to identify any given organism, we have seen this critter about a thousand times: this is a carpet beetle larva. Carpet beetles are notorious insects that feed on textile items such as clothing, bed sheets and, yes, carpets. As such, they have earned the status of ‘pest’, as infestations of them can cause significant damage to such items in one’s home, and they can often go unnoticed for long periods of time.

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Posted in Cat Worms Worms Found in the House Worms Generally

Pink Worm Found by Cat Food Bowls May Require a Medical Diagnosis

“I live in Madison County, Kentucky, USA, and today I found a small worm on the floor in my bedroom”, writes this reader in his submission about the thin, pink worm pictured below. “My room is on the second floor of my house, and the bathroom is almost directly outside it. I have three cats (strictly indoor, they almost always stay in my room due to my little brother not knowing how to pet them nicely) and since I found this worm near their food bowls, I am very worried it might be in some way parasitic or harmful to them. I included a diagram with a pencil for size reference since my phone quality isn’t very good, but the worm itself is also in the picture of the diagram as well as the other pictures. I think I’m going to flush this worm for now, but I’m hoping to identify it and see if this is a problem in case another one shows up in the future! Thank you for your time!”

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Posted in Earthworms Segmented Worms Annelida Worms Found in the House

Pink and Gray Worm Found in Urine May be Annelid

“Can you please identify the worm in this picture that is found in human urine?” is all this reader asks in his submission regarding the gray and pink worm pictured below. The worm is rather long, segmented, and has semi-transparent skin: at least, so we think. Our theory is that the pink part near the end of its body is a view into the inside of the worm. Based on the photo, we would think this is some type of annelid, though our identification should not be taken at face value. The reason for this is the lack of context of our reader’s situation: he does not specify if the worm came from someone’s body, and was then found in their urine, or if somebody peed, then looked in the toilet, and saw the worm there.

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Posted in Composting Worms Interesting Worms Worms Found in the House

Long, Dark Worm in Loo is Likely a Detritivore

“I found this in my loo”, writes this reader about the long, dark worm pictured below in a toilet bowl. “Please help.” He provides no further context, and we must say that the photo he provided is quite dark and not the best quality, which makes it harder to see the worm’s physical characteristics (other than the obvious ones). With that said, we can still make an educated guess as to what it is, and in any case, we would guess that it is some kind of detritivore. Detritivores are organisms that feed on decomposing organic matter, and there are plenty of worms and worm-like organisms that fit this description, including earthworms and millipedes.

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Posted in Dog Worms Flatworm Worms Found in the House

Dark Green Worm Found on Dog is a Flatworm

“I found this worm on the abdomen of my short haired dog”, writes this reader in her submission regarding the dark green worm-like critter pictured below. “The vet had no idea. The dog was born in South Carolina but has lived six years in western NY, including time spent in one of the finger lakes.” To start with, we want to compliment our reader on the fantastic photo she took, and thank her for it, as it really helps us narrow down what the organism could be. The photo shows a long stripe running down the middle of the worm’s body, and also shows what looks like a bulbous, black head. Additionally, it looks almost as if the worm is more flat than round in shape.

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Posted in Centipedes and Millipedes Worms Found in the House Worms Generally

Black Worm-like Critter with Antennae is a Millipede

“What is this worm?” asks this reader in her submission regarding the small, black organism pictured below. “How do I get rid of it? They’re everywhere. I’m in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.” Based on the excellent photo she sent, we think that this is a millipede. Its segmentation, size, and antennae point to this conclusion, as well as the apparent lack of legs. What we must note is that millipedes actually possess many legs, and that is what they are known for, but since they grow from the underside of their bodies, they are often not visible. As such, people often mistake millipedes for worms and marvel at how they seemingly glide across a surface.

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Posted in Interesting Bugs Worms Facts Worms Found in the House

Green Worm with Antennae and Six Legs is a Beetle Larva

“What kind of worm is this, and how do I prevent another one in my home?” asks this reader in her submission about the greenish worm pictured below. “I awoke to a bite or sting from this fellow on my back shoulder. We are in North Florida, 6/25/22. I felt it crawling on my arm, knocked it off, went back to sleep to awake to a burning feeling on my back. Do you know what it is?” Based on the creature’s possession of six legs and its antennae, we are inclined to identify this as a beetle larva of some kind, though we do not know exactly what species it belongs to.

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Posted in Centipedes and Millipedes Worms Facts Worms Found in the House

Black Worms with Antennae Found All Over House are Millipedes

“What is the worm pictured and why are they all of a sudden all over the inside of my house?” asks this reader in her submission regarding the black worm-like creature pictured below. “And how do I get rid of them?” In addition to its black coloration, the creature seems to be segmented and possess a set of antennae. Based on the visual information alone, we would say this is probably a millipede. You cannot see it on the photo, but this creature has multiple sets of legs on the underside of its body, which often gives the millipede the appearance of gliding across surfaces as it walks.

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Posted in Cat Worms Centipedes and Millipedes Worms Found in the House

Brittle, Spiral-shaped Worms Could Have Been Dried-up Millipedes

“I didn’t get a picture, but I can describe something I found under some dirty blankets my cat decided to sleep on”, writes this reader in her submission. “I live in northwest Indiana. Bandit is an indoor-only cat, he gets Revolution monthly, and has tested negative for parasites. When I picked up the blankets, there were three off-white, about two or three inches long, very brittle, long, spiral-shaped (like a spiral staircase) objects. Not moving, did not see any head, or other features. Picked up with gloves and they fragmented instantly. Very regular spiral shape, all exactly the same. Any ideas what that may have been? Not even sure if they were worms. Thanks.”

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Posted in Drain Fly Larvae Worms Facts Worms Found in the House

Gray Worm-like Critter Found in Shower is a Drain Fly Larva

“What type of worm or larva is this?” asks this reader about the dark gray worm-like creature pictured below. “Found in the shower. Location in northern Alabama. Thanks!” To start with, we want to thank our reader for taking such a clear picture: it really helps us get a quick grasp on what the organism might be. In this case, we think this is probably a drain fly larva. Not only does its physical characteristics match that of a drain fly larva, but the location in which it was found also makes sense. As their name suggests, drain fly larvae are usually found in drains. This is because the mother fly will lay her eggs there, specifically on the thin film that forms in drains that are not regularly cleaned.

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Posted in Drain Fly Larvae Worms Found in the House Worms Generally

Dark Brown Worms in Jacuzzi Jets are Drain Fly Larvae

“From what I have read I think I may have drain fly larvae in my jacuzzi jets”, writes this reader in her submission regarding the organism pictured below. “They are dark brown and when looked at through a magnifying glass, they look like tiny millipedes. Can you please confirm? Thank you!” Immediately off the bat, can we say that these are indeed drain fly larvae: their long, thin dark bodies and tapered ends point to this conclusion. Likewise, the location they were found in matches up with the behavior of drain fly larvae.

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Posted in Caterpillars Indian Meal Moth Larvae Worms Found in the House

Why Do Moth Larvae Enter People’s Homes?

“Where do the moth larvae come from?” asks this reader in his submission. “Why are they in my house?” He does not attach any photos to his submission, nor does he provide further context, so we do not know exactly which moth larvae he is dealing with. That said, we will nonetheless provide a brief overview of some of the moth larvae people typically find in their home and why and how they end up there. Moths are insects, and like any insect passes through three distinct stages of life: ‘larvahood’, pupation, and finally adulthood (when they have metamorphosed into a moth).