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Bag Worms

Bag worms are interesting creatures. They grow on the inside of little bags that can be found hidden inside the bark of the tree trunks. Inside these bags, you might find hundreds, if not thousands of eggs containing bag worms (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis). The larva prefer red cedar and arborvitae but they also like apple, birch, black locust, cypress, elm, juniper, oak, pine, poplar, spruce, and sycamore. Bag worms occurs mostly from New England to Nebraska and south through the state of Texas. Inside of the bag, which may be camouflaged with foliage, bark, and other debris, the larva is tan or brown with black spots. Once it emerges, the larva is black. It spins down on a silk string in search of a host plant. In some cases, the larva never makes it all the way down on the string, Continue reading [...]

Bagworms and Bark

The bagworm larva prefer red cedar and arborvitae above all as well as apple, birch, black locust, cypress, elm, juniper, oak, pine, poplar, spruce, and sycamore. The bagworm occurs mostly from New England to Nebraska and south through the state of Texas. Continue reading [...]

Natural Controls for Webworms, Tent Caterpillars, and Bagworms

Many individuals choose natural methods for the control of webworms, tent caterpillars and bagworms. Each worm species requires different tactics and home remedies are not always successful. Continue reading [...]

Tree Pests: Bagworms, Tentworms, and Webworms

Bagworms, tentworms, and webworms feed on tree leaves and can create varying levels of damage. Evergreens and deciduous trees are all at risk from infestations by these unsightly worms. Continue reading [...]

Bag Worms

Bag worms can be a real garden pest if not kept under control. The good news is that it is possible to keep bag worms under control with just a bit of diligence. Continue reading [...]
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All About Worms