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Bright Red Worm Found in Toilet is an Oligochaete

A red worm was found in the toilet by one of our readers one night. This red worm appears to have sheer skin, is quite long and has a thin body, and our reader asks that we identify it for them. Continue reading [...]

Little Red Worms Coming From Tap in the Philippines are Midge Fly Larvae

"Very thin, little red worms" have been coming from this woman's tap in La Union, the Philippines. She asks that we help identify the critters and provide insight on how to get rid of them completely. Continue reading [...]

Stripey Red Worm in Toilet in Scotland is a Red Wiggler

A long stripey, red worm was found in a toilet in Southern Scotland by this reader on the first floor of his home. He wonders if we can tell him what it is. Continue reading [...]

Long, Striped Worm in Toilet is a Red Wriggler

A worm was found in the toilet of this reader, alive, and she wonders if we could help identify it for her as she is "freaked" out. The worm in question appears to be red in color, with segmented stripes, and a long, smooth body. Continue reading [...]
Worm in the Shower

Canadian Worms Can Take A Shower Too

One of our Canadian readers' two-year-old son and her husband had just finished up a shower when they found this worm in the tub. They'd had a shallow bath at one point, after which her husband had taken the shower head down and thoroughly sprayed down the tub, walls, etc. and there was nothing in the tub at that point. After they were done and ready to get out, this was crawling in the bottom of the tub at the opposite end from the drain. From what we're provided, it appears to be an annelid, perhaps a bloodworm but likely an earthworm that rode in on one of the bathers or perhaps found its way into the tub when Dad pulled the shower head out of the wall mount to spray the surround clean. No object or measurement has been included to determine scale but we will estimate this creature Continue reading [...]
worms and flood

What Happens to Worms in Hurricane and Flood Weather?

As Hurricane Matthew moves off the east coast of the United States leaving flood waters behind, communities are reeling. Did you ever wonder what happens to worms when it floods? We know that when it rains, earthworms come to the surface to help regulate their breathing for migration overland. As worms don't have lungs, they breathe through their skin, and in order to do so they need moisture. The temporary wet conditions after rain allows them to move greater distances across the soil. Because they don't have lungs, earthworms can't drown like people do, either. So it's good that earthworms can survive underwater for several days. But do earthworms ever come up in standing or running water, and if so, what do they do? Earthworms and other invertabrates negotiate the rising and falling Continue reading [...]
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