Brown Worm-like Creatures in Toilet are Black Soldier Fly Larvae

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“What are these brown worm-like bugs in my toilet?” asks AnnaMarie in her submission regarding the two, segmented creatures pictured below. She offers no further context, and, unfortunately, the lighting is not the best, and it is hard to make out the organisms’ finer characteristics. That said, based on their shape – particularly the little tapered tip at one end of its body – we think that these might be black soldier fly larvae. How these two critters would have come to show up in AnnaMarie’s toilet is a mystery to us, as black soldier fly larvae are not typically found in this spot.

Black soldier fly larvae, otherwise referred to simply as BSFL, are a species of fly that are not only quite famous, but popular too. Although the larvae are not the prettiest of creatures, they are very beneficial to the environment, and may prove to be even more beneficial to the environment in the future. This is for a number of reasons. For example, BSFL are decomposers, just like earthworms. They can eat waste materials and convert them to nutrient rich fertilizers via digestion. What is so great about BSFL is that, even in large numbers (which they usually come by), their carbon footprint is relatively low, meaning they do not produce a lot of greenhouse gases when they eat and ultimately digest.

Additionally, BSFL are more and more being integrated into multiple facets of our lives in order to make them more sustainable. For example, they are working their way into our foods (like ice cream and bread). It sounds gross, but BSFL are high in protein and other nutrients, and they are one of the most sustainable ways of getting those nutrients. Likewise, they can replace certain pet foods, as well as fish meal, which helps combat exploitation in aquatic habitats. On top of all of that, they can even be turned into a sort of organic plastic!

Like a lot of insects, the black soldier fly larva needs to eat a lot in order to successfully undergo pupation and transform into its adult stage, so they are not easy to satisfy. Their presence in AnnaMarie’s home might indicate that her home is littered with organic debris, such as spilled food or drink. Of course, these ones were found in her toilet, so that might mean that her toilet is in need of cleaning. Either way, the best way to ensure that insects of any kind do not enter one’s home is to keep it regularly cleaned.

To conclude, we think that the two brown worm-like creatures AnnaMarie found in her toilet are black soldier fly larvae. They are completely harmless, and are very beneficial to the environment, so we do not advise that she kill them. Instead, just move them outside: since they are not picky eaters, they will find something to eat outside anyway. We hope this helps and we wish AnnaMarie the very best!

 

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Summary
Brown Worm-like Creatures in Toilet are Black Soldier Fly Larvae
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Brown Worm-like Creatures in Toilet are Black Soldier Fly Larvae
Description
"What are these brown worm-like bugs in my toilet?" asks AnnaMarie in her submission regarding the two, segmented creatures pictured below. She offers no further context, and, unfortunately, the lighting is not the best, and it is hard to make out the organisms' finer characteristics. That said, based on their shape - particularly the little tapered tip at one end of its body - we think that these might be black soldier fly larvae. How these two critters would have come to show up in AnnaMarie's toilet is a mystery to us, as black soldier fly larvae are not typically found in this spot.
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Author: Worm Researcher Anton

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