A Very Brief Look at Eradicating Infestations of Moth and Housefly Larvae

‘How do I get rid of moth larvae and common house fly larvae in Northwest Georgia’ asks this reader in his one-line query to us. Despite the lack of photographs and context, we will do our best to answer this question.

First of all, when it comes to moths whose larvae are commonly found in the home, there are three main species. One species is the Indianmeal moth (otherwise known as the pantry moth), and the other two are the webbing clothes moth and the casemaking clothes moth, both of which are clothes moths. As our reader does not specify what moth larvae he wanted to know about, we will tell him a little bit about them all. The Indianmeal moth larva is found in the kitchen and/or pantry, and eats all things grain-based, such as cereals, rice and oats. They can also get into dog food.These guys are white in color, though their skin is semi transparent, and they have bulbous brown heads. It is worth noting that all of these three clothes moth larvae fit that exact description. Indianmeal moth larvae are best eradicated by throwing out infested foods, freezing grains before storing them in the pantry, and ensuring that the grains stored in the pantry are sealed in airtight containers. If our reader wants more information specific to this critter, he can check out this past article we wrote on Indianmeal moth larvae.

When it comes to webbing clothes moth larvae and casemaking clothes moth larvae, these guys look and behave very similarly. Their diets consist of animal-based materials, such as textiles, fur and feathers. They can be found in between the folds of clothing, underneath upholstered furniture, in the attic and in bird’s nests, to name a few locations. Infestations can spread quickly without notice, so it is best to catch the infestation early on. Signs that there are clothes moth larvae roaming your home include: faecal pellets, patches of webbing, small tubes of silk (specific to the casemaking clothes moth larva) and, of course, the larvae themselves. Eggs can be spotted too, but usually they remain unseen to the naked eye. Getting rid of clothes moth larvae requires consistent vacuuming, laundering, steam-cleaning (of carpets, rugs and potentially other materials if necessary), implementing preventative measures and a keen eye. If our reader wants a more in-depth look at these guys, he needs look no further than this article we wrote on clothes moth larvae.

Secondly, with regard to common house fly larvae (commonly referred to as maggots), these are also household pests that can cause infestations. Like pantry moth larvae, house fly larvae are found in the kitchen. Though instead of the pantry, these guys tend to stick to the compost bins and trash can, where they feed on rotting food waste. Luckily, maggots are far easier to get rid of than pantry moth larvae or clothes moth larvae. This is because they usually stick to the site of rotting food, and so usually they are only found in trash cans. That being said, we urge our reader to check inside his cupboards and underneath his refrigerator and cabinets for any food that may have spilled or fallen there that is lying and rotting. This could also be attracting house flies. To get rid of house fly larvae, one must ensure there is no spilled food lying about in their home, nor old food that is getting bad in the fridge, and that their trash can is consistently emptied. If maggots are discovered, one should immediately throw their garbage away (the irony), as breeding can just continue inside the trash can and thus the infestation grows, and inspect their home for any rotting organic debris. If our reader wants to read up more on maggots, he can refer to this article we wrote on housefly and drainfly larvae.

To conclude, despite not knowing exactly how this question applies to our reader (in terms of whether or not he is actually experiencing an infestation or if he is simply curious), we hope this brief article outlining some key facts and basic ways to get rid of moth and housefly larvae proves useful for him. We wish him the best of luck with his endeavours!

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A Very Brief Look at Eradicating Infestations of Moth and Housefly Larvae
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A Very Brief Look at Eradicating Infestations of Moth and Housefly Larvae
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'How do I get rid of moth larvae and common house fly larvae in Northwest Georgia' asks this reader in his one-line query to us. Despite the lack of photographs and context, we will do our best to answer this question.
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